Tag: emotions


How to reduce worry when waiting for potentially bad news

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21st November

Do you ever worry when waiting for important news? Maybe when you have gone for a job interview and you’re waiting to hear whether or not you might get the job. Perhaps you had a medical test and you’re hoping that it won’t be bad news. Maybe you pitched an idea to a client, but you’re really not sure how things will turn out. Or your line manager tells you … Read more


Boost your mood in 3 weeks

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24th October

I work as a psychologist. So, of course I recommend a lot of psychological techniques to clients to help them boost their productivity, skills, job prospects, and emotional wellbeing. However, there are some things that can affect the mind and our wellbeing that do not require mental methods.

A recent study set out to reduce symptoms of depression in only 3 weeks. Researchers randomly assigned young adults (aged between 17 … Read more


5 reasons to be concerned about rudeness at work

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6th May

Unfortunately, most of us have either been on the receiving end of rudeness or have observed it going on around us. It’s something we are so used to that we probably just accept it. But here are 5 ways in which incivility can affect us.

1. Observing rudeness reduces performance and creativity
Of course being on the direct receiving end of rudeness can make us feel angry or frustrated. But … Read more


Boost your health and mental performance in just 10 minutes

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17th January

Research shows that it can take as little as ten minutes to improve our physical health, psychological wellbeing, and our mental performance.

All around the world, scientists have been discovering that simply spending time outdoors in nature has measurable, significant benefits for both physical and mental health. For example, an investigation led by Cornell University’s Genevive Meredith recently summarised the conclusions reached by multiple groups of researchers looking at time … Read more


Identifying and tackling sources of stress at work

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27th September

Surveys repeatedly find that many people report feeling stress as a result of their work.

I have written before about the fact that stress is not something that simply happens to you. You can take steps to deal with the emotional impact of problematic situations.

However, the best way to reduce stress is often to tackle the particular problem that is bothering you such as an individual colleague, a … Read more


How to cope with stress

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30th August

Whenever I run a workshop (or give a lecture on Zoom) about stress, I usually start off by explaining that stress is not something that has to happen to you. Yes, certain events such as redundancy, relationship break-ups and illness tend to be difficult for many people. But some people help themselves to cope better.

In stressful circumstances, I’m sure you have heard that some people engage in a coping … Read more


3 research-based facts about happiness in work and life

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2nd August

Ask people what they want in life and they often say that they want to “be happy”. But why does happiness matter? And how can you achieve happiness?

1. Being happy may help you to be better at your job
Some people dismiss happiness as inconsequential. For example, I’ve heard a few managers say that they don’t really care whether their employees are happy so long as they are performing … Read more


Eat your way to happiness

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27th October

Do you ever feel anxious, moody or depressed? Well, a growing body of evidence suggests that what we eat may have very real effects on our mental health.

A group of scientists recently published the results of a major study in which they monitored the physical and mental health of 15,546 adults over a 10-year period. A team led by Almudena Sanchez-Villegas found that higher levels of added sugars and … Read more